Thursday, May 03, 2007

History of Personal computer

An near the beginning use of the term appeared in a November 3, 1962, New York Times
article exposure John W. Mauchly's vision of expectations computing spoken to a conference of the American Institute of Industrial Engineers that previous day. Mauchly told the gathering, "There is no reason to suppose the average boy or girl cannot be master of a personal computer."

The initial computers that can be called 'personal' were the first Non -main frame computers, the LINC and the PDP-8. By today's standards they were big, expensive, and had small magnetic core memories.

However, they were small and cheap for individual laboratories and research projects to use, freeing them from the consignment dispensation and establishment of the typical industrial or university computing center. In addition, they were reasonably interactive and soon had their own operating systems. Finally, this category became known as the mini-computer, usually with time-sharing and program development facilities. Ultimately, the mini-computer grew up to encompass the VAX and larger mini-computers from Data General, Prime, and others.
Deployment of mini-computer systems was a replica for how personal computers would be used, but few of the mini-computer makers managed to profit from it.


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